Address: The Mall, London SW1A 1BA

Website

Time: August 2015 from 10.00am

Time Information: www.royalcollection.org.uk/visit/clarencehouse/what-to-see-and-do/guided-tour

Phone: 0208 995 0508, 0207 930 4832

Entry Price: £9.80 for adult

Entry Information:www.royalcollection.org.uk/visit/clarencehouse/plan-your-visit

1100m from Victoria

500m from St James's Park

Address: The Mall, London SW1A 1BA

Website

Time: August 2015 from 10.00am

Phone: 0208 995 0508, 0207 930 4832

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Time Information: www.royalcollection.org.uk/visit/clarencehouse/what-to-see-and-do/guided-tour
Entry Price: £9.80 for adult
Entry Information: www.royalcollection.org.uk/visit/clarencehouse/plan-your-visit

Clarence House is a royal residence that was built in 1825 and stands between Buckingham Palace and St James’s Palace and is connected to the latter. It’s best remembered for being, for almost fifty years until 2002, the home of the Queen Mother and this saw well wishers crowding the streets outside the House on her birthday. Today Prince Charles, Prince William and Prince Harry have apartments there. From 1949 until succeeding to the throne in 1953, it was the home of Queen Elizabeth II.

It was first built for the Duke of Clarence, the son of George III, and was designed by one of Britain’s greatest architects, John Nash. It cost £22,232. Following the deaths of his father and brother, the Duke came to the throne as William IV and remained at Clarence House as Buckingham Palace was still incomplete. When the Houses of Parliament was destroyed by fire in 1834, William offered Buckingham Palace as a replacement.

After William, it was the home of his sister, Princess Augusta until 1840 and then Queen Victoria’s mother until 1861. It was vacant until 1865 when Victoria’s second son Alfred, the Duke of Edinburgh moved in. Alfred did substantial work on the house, both structurally and cosmetically and filled the house with all manner of items from his incredible sailing career. He moved to Germany in 1893, but retained the House until his death in 1900.

Alfred’s younger brother Arthur, Duke of Connaught took residence until 1942 and as this was during the Second World War it became a wonderful opportunity to house 200 staff of the Red Cross who looked after troops worldwide. The house suffered a degree of bomb damage at this time.

Today whilst much of the building is used as offices, with large rooms used at times for official entertaining, it’s still very much a royal home. As with Buckingham Palace, the house is open to visitors in summer months.

The garden of Clarence House overlooks The Mall and is surrounded by some of the most famous parks and landmarks in central London.

Click on the pics below for an enlarged view and use the arrow towards the right edge of each pic to go on to the next.