Address: London SW1

1000m from Victoria

50m from Sloane Square

Sloane Square is an area in Chelsea that is synonymous with trendy, upmarket wealth with locals often labelled ‘Sloane Rangers’. The surrounding area contains hugely expensive property and the Square and nearby roads are often the shopping and social destination of the residents as well as both local visitors and tourists.

The area was originally meadow with a local landowner being Irish doctor Sir Hans Sloane who was Lord of the Manor in 1712. In 1771 builder Henry Holland acquired the building rights from the heirs of Sir Hans and planned a development called Hans Town. It was an 89 acre site with over 300 houses with Sloane Square being the central feature. Sir Hans had been an avid collector and his collection was acquired by the government and started off the famous British Museum. Many local streets bear his name and include Hans Street, Hans Crescent, Hans Place, Hans Road and Sloane Street.

Nearby King’s Road, today known as one of London’s most fashionable streets, was a private road used by royalty. Henry VIII travelled along it to get to his palace by the Thames, Charles II to get from Whitehall to Hampton Court and George III to get to Kew Palace. It opened to the public in 1836.

There was a great deal of redevelopment around the late 19th century. Sloane Square tube station opened in 1868, the Royal Court Theatre in 1870 and the Holy Trinity Church in 1890. The Peter Jones department store that dominates one side of the Square and is a legendary local store as well as being a Grade II listed building was built in 1936.

The Square has been subject to recent talks of redevelopment with suggestions put forward to divert the Square roads and make it a pedestrianised area. The feature of the Square today, apart from the plane trees, is the Grade II listed Venus Fountain, erected in 1953.

To Londoners, Sloane Square is one of the most famous London landmarks and most recognisable name.

Click on the pics below for an enlarged view and use the arrow towards the right edge of each pic to go on to the next.